The Yorktown Memorial Hospital has been through every kind of emotion you could possibly think of. It was a catholic hospital and some of the nuns were even nurses themselves. Shadows frequent the halls, as well as the old ER/OR rooms and screams, can be heard on occasion coming from the labor and delivery ward. There are plenty of stories about the true number of people who died in the hospital, but the number is said to be around 2,000. The Felician Sisters themselves are said to still be in the hospital – or at least an entity masquerading as the nuns is there. The Felician Sisters of the Roman Catholic Church are the ones that planned and built Yorktown Memorial Hospital. Yorktown Memorial had considerable trouble keeping staff, and apparently the high employee-turn-over resulted in pretty poor standards of care. It’s also known as a hotspot for capturing top-notch EVPs, with many sessions yielding clear voices.

The Yorktown Memorial Hospital was opened the year following its construction, its name paying homage to those from Yorktown who fought and lost their lives during WWII. Creep it real until next time, my Ghost Texas friends….

“So that more may live longer.” That was the quote of the hospital. He stabbed the woman several times, killing her. The Felician Sisters of the Roman Catholic Church kept the hospital open until 1986, when another hospital opened up just a few miles away in Cuero, Texas, thus putting Memorial Hospital out of business. So with original structures dating back 150 years, I’m going to go ahead and say that the Yorktown Memorial Hospital probably isn’t the only active location in the town, but let’s focus on the hospital. Dying too soon, dying due to negligence, dying under any extreme emotional distress seems to produce a lot of hauntings, and I think those people really need help – like the entity known as TJ that I discussed above. The C. Eckhardt & Sons Building is almost 150 years old, standing to this day as the Yorktown Historical Museum. The nuns would close around 10:00 p.m. The somewhat infamous Yorktown Memorial Hospital dates back to 1950, when construction began, and it opened in 1951. Nobody seems to know how Stacy died, just that she’s very active on the property. But I won’t philosophize on that too much here. One sister has been seen in different spots around the building, and photos of her in her habit have been caught as well. The somewhat infamous Yorktown Memorial Hospital dates back to 1950, when construction began, and it opened in 1951. Many of his patients entering the operating rooms under his care alive, didn’t come back out the same way. Hollering Woman in Woman Hollering Creek maintains that the woman is still grieving and searching for her murdered family along the banks, A post shared by (@laurenkubala), A post shared by (@thecraftyvoyager). Since she loved story time, she can be enticed by sitting in the library reading her favorite book. A post shared by (@laurenkubala) on Jul 29, 2020 at 7:15pm PDT. Paranormal investigations can go in for a cool $500 (up to 10 investigators, a limited amount of time inside).

The Yorktown Memorial Hospital stands with its arched entrance untouched by brush, which has had its way with the rest of the property. a very scary EVP was captured on Ghost Adventures when Aaron Goodwin went down here by himself. Dr. Nowierski and the nuns might be waiting. Yorktown Memorial Hospital was named for – at least according to the sources I found – the USS Yorktown, which was attacked … The reputation of the hospital, despite being run by a rather large religious institution, hasn’t been the best. My search for specific reports of activity was richly rewarded when researching this location. Yorktown has seen it’s portal to life and death. The total number of recorded deaths at Yorktown Memorial is around 2000. The doctor became known for his fatal mistakes during operations. What’s up, fellow ghost-geeks? After forty years of service, In 1988, the facility closed it’s doors. It was a catholic hospital and some of the nuns were even nurses themselves. Well, you’ve got the shadow figures, disembodied moans and screams, black apparitions with glowing red eyes, talking dolls, and tapping noises on the glass of one of the lobby doors. The second floor of the hospital was entirely living quarters for those employed there. Yorktown Memorial Hospital was named for – at least according to the sources I found – the USS Yorktown, which was attacked and sunk during the Battle of Midway during WWII. One article I found stated that Dr. Nowierski actually slit a patient’s throat when attempting a procedure on the thyroid.

The Yorktown Memorial Hospital was opened the year following its construction, its name paying homage to those from Yorktown who fought and lost their lives during WWII. The killer is coming.” Never a fun thing.

But when he rang the back-door bell, no one answered. One article I found stated that the hospital lost 500 patients in a six-year-span, which, to those of us who don’t know, is extremely high. Unfortunately, it seems that this hospital saw more death than it did lives saved. An apparition of a nun in full habit has been seen many times in various areas of the hospital, and it’s said that people who visit who also have tattoos have been choked, scratched, or rushed presumably by the strict nuns. In its 40 year history, the hospital has had about 2,000 deaths. Past the Yorktown Creek and a few fast food joints lies a foreboding structure. Or should he? Definitely human blood.

Whoa. The town of Yorktown, in DeWitt County, lies between San Antonio and the Gulf of Mexico. The possibly negative energy from pieces of original furniture and even blood from a violent altercation could be what ties these spirits even tighter to the building. A staggering number of fatalities for such a small building in such a small amount of time, it’s no wonder it is said to be plagued by wandering and restless spirits today. During its time under the care of the nuns, the hospital was said to have lost over 500 patients in a six-year span.

There’s not a lot of history about it, mostly because it’s always been an area with a relatively small population.